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Philosophy

Livin' Ludic

Livin' Ludic

Over the years, I increasingly gain an impression of my lived experience as being game-like. I find myself accidentally playing ‘Nell Watson RPG’, a game whereby the player roams around an open world, accepting quests and requests for help from a variety of NPCs. Sometimes the player character will accept a reward after the fact, but often just knowing that the state of play is improved in some way is plenty in itself.

The game also includes a lengthy main quest to help ‘save the world’ through shepherding into being new social technologies. Along the way, various other players have joined up as a party, in order to effect some goal or mission. In doing this, I have learned how to better align my character's strengths with those of others in the party, each taking their respective ideal roles.


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Egresso Arca Archa

Egresso Arca Archa

The cultural training set makes our primate brain able to achieve sapience. Without culture, our brains are beast-like and uninteresting. Feral children lack the spark of humanity, and yet our cultural training can make apes and dogs understand our language, and even feel strong human morality. 

What makes us human is not the hardware, it is the software training set. What we are, is an emergent property of cultural training. 


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The Paradox of Parenting Our Parents

The Paradox of Parenting Our Parents

A good friend of mine shared with me this video from the Guardian.

I really do love the 'leaving the babies in the ballpit' part. That's actually one of the most likely scenarios. "You're all a bit mental and rather tiresome, so, so long, bald troggos."

Mankind may in fact have more to fear from a benevolent machine that cares deeply about animals than one that's generally disinterested in mundane creatures. Any sufficiently benevolent action will appear malevolent to a lesser-evolved moral mind.


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The Umbrella Ethic of Good Faith

The Umbrella Ethic of Good Faith

I'm concerned about the polarization in society lately, a trend that has been increasing for several years.

Sometimes a polar approach to certain issues may have some merit. The problem lies in an inability to understand the views of others (even though one may not agree). If one can see the mistakes that others make in their assumptions and perceptions, then one is more likely to be able to spot similar biases within one's own views.

I regularly update my beliefs and values. Underlying principles change very slowly, but new information can create a more nuanced understanding of certain issues that I previously had not considered or been aware of.

If we are to progress as a civilization it is essential that we learn to practice good faith.


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